WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: I’D RATHER BE….

You’ve seen bumper stickers that read “I’d rather be…”.  Yep. Twitter on Wheels.

 

Writing in public places is meant to be read.

 

 

I think a bumper sticker creates a relationship between the “writer car” and the “reader car”.   One of my all-time faves ~ “This Bumper Isn’t BIG ENOUGH For What I’ve Got to Say!”

 

 

 

Stick figure families were popular for a while. Not so much anymore.

 

 

I guess the writer car is saying I don’t care about your stick figure family to the reader car. So there.

But bumper stickers aren’t all raw-knuckled and razor-edged.  Case in point: Koren’s beasts.

 

 

 

I’m a stonking huge fan of his unreservedly brilliant animal cartoons.

 

And when I head up to the children’s room at the library, a entire constellation of critters cavort up the stairs.  Animals with books, a whimsically playful bunch.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They all have a book or three.

My response to “I’d rather be…”?

 I’d rather be at the library.*

Going up?

Toni 3/17/18

*And, of course, today… I’d rather be Irish.  Sláinte!

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Weekly Photo Challenge: Peek

Peeking out from the trompe l’oeil on the ceiling of my room in Paris is this charming imp.   Trompe l’oeil is a French term, meaning to “deceive the eye”.  European painters, from the early Renaissance onward, created mesmerising illusions like this one by painting false frames out of which people appear to spill.

Toni 11/5/17

 

WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: TEXTURE

Soul to soul, artist to viewer, quilters make fabric sing.  The skilled touch of their hands transforms thread into a symphony.  I saw these wall art quilts at an exhibit in Florida and was awed by the tactile and visual texture of the designs.

 

Richly layered and interconnected ridges.
Valleys of batting and cloth.
Creative minds and joy-filled souls.
Contemporarily brilliant.

 

Toni 8/3/17

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave