WEEKLY PHOTO CHALLENGE: OPPOSITES

The entire poem, Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird, by the wildly abstract Wallace Stevens remains a mystery to me.  Pick any stanza.  Let’s say, V.

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Is it a stretch to say that Stanza V opposes two types of beauty? (Probably, but Ben Huberman’s post led me here. A complex and divergent literary trip, to be sure, not unlike the one through this poem.)

 

 

How will-o’-the-ˈwispy Stevens can be. Those opposing beauties?  2116646_orig

Might he mean one distinct and the other suggestive, that the blackbird’s whistling is there to illustrate?

 

 

 

 

 

No matter. Just click here to read about the Wallace Stevens Walk in Hartford, CT.    You may even feel compelled to write a ‘Thirteen Ways’ koan. (BTW, a central theme of many koans is the ‘identity of opposites’.)  Have a go, be inscrutable like Wally and his blackbird.  Zen-like, even.

If two wings flap and there is a sound, what is the sound of one wing flapping?

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Toni 7/5/16

 

I’m going to reread Lord of the Rings. I don’t want to be overwhelmed by fear and anguish. I want to stand in the sway of the mythic and heroic.

Here’s what I’m holding in front of me as I read about the terror in the world be it Isis or Sauron (Lord of the Rings). I want to have the courage of the small people. I will keep in mind Samwise Gamwich: “There, peeping among the cloud-wrack above a dark tor high up in the mountains, Sam saw a white star twinkle for a while. The beauty of it smote his heart, as he looked up out of the forsaken land, and hope returned to him. For like a shaft, clear and cold, the thought pierced him that in the end the Shadow was only a small and passing thing: there was light and high beauty for ever beyond its reach.”