IMG_9048

 

I bask in Luke’s talktalktalklaughlaughlaugh.

This is a boy who knows how to converse,

w/ his words highly relevant to their situation

& contingent upon one another. Also, he chortles w/ glee & mischief

like the Barred Owl who engaged us on that dirt road in the woods,

the one who swooped in, perched, peered,

& talked, responding to our “who cooks for you,”

following up on our words & bouncing joy right back.

I bask.

PATTY

These pictures were taken by Ray Belding, bird guru and a handy guy with a camera, who called in the Barred Owl on that dirt road by doing his “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you-all?” in a rich baritone, thinking to call in a Pileated Woodpecker who responds to such. Instead, the chatty Barred Owl showed up and stayed for coffee.

P1060704

P1060702https://youtu.be/KYTkZ8PZ3EU

Don’t be fooled: that Fox Republican Debate wasn’t such at all. Sound bites all ’round (except for Chris and Rand’s heated back and forth on NSA’s spying capabilities, an issue of substance) Luke and my Barred Owl could give lessons to the whole stage on how talk goes; and the perspective and boost a little joy can give too. (A 420 Character, 9-line poem by Patty)

 

4 thoughts on “Don’t be fooled: that Fox Republican Debate wasn’t such at all. Sound bites all ’round (except for Chris and Rand’s heated back and forth on NSA’s spying capabilities, an issue of substance) Luke and my Barred Owl could give lessons to the whole stage on how talk goes; and the perspective and boost a little joy can give too. (A 420 Character, 9-line poem by Patty)

    1. We are connected with their journey; the trick seems to be to figure out how to stay connected as they get older, move away, have children of their own and take a back seat–if invited, that is!! I love seeing how it all’s unfolding.
      Patty

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Here’s more on what real conversation consists of. I love the examples in this smart piece from Susan E. Brennan. I started looking on the Internet for more specifics when one of our readers said, “so what else is there to conversation?” (Brennan, S. E. (2010; In press). Conversation and dialogue. To appear in H. Pashler (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the Mind. SAGE Publications. Conversation and Dialogue by Susan E. Brennan)

    “A conversation is not simply a sequence of messages expressed as speaking turns, produced by speakers, and received and decoded by addressees. Conversations are structured into adjacency pairs, with first and second parts produced by different speakers as in this example:
    Juliet: Art thou not Romeo, and a Montague? Romeo: Neither,fairmaid,ifeithertheedislike.
    (Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Act 2, Scene 2)
    By itself, Juliet’s utterance does not yet count as a question; she cannot be sure that man lurking beneath her balcony has heard and understood her until she has the evidence from his response. And Romeo’s answer ends up transforming what might have been left to stand as a yes/no question to something highly relevant to their situation, implicating both its interpersonal and familial risks. Utterances in conversation (whether spoken, typed, or produced manually using sign language) are contingent upon one another, such that interpretation depends very much on context.
    Real conversation is spontaneous rather than scripted in advance; it is shaped by the coordinated behavior of speakers and addressees. For these reasons, it differs considerably from edited texts. Utterances unfold over time; they are both planned and interpreted incrementally. Consider this excerpt from a telephone conversation between two British acquaintances (adapted from Svartvik and Quirk’s London-Lund corpus):
    Brad: thanks for ringing Amanda: right – bye
    Brad: bye bye
    see you next week Amanda: see you
    Brad: see you soon
    Amanda: m
    (both):
    Amanda: you’re hopeless
    Brad: sorry
    Amanda: you’re hopeless –
    Brad: well no more than you Amanda:
    no more than usual either
    Brad: no more no more
    than you I said
    not usual
    Amanda: oh I know
    I said no more than usual Brad: ah I’m sorry
    Amanda: have you got a new job yet

    Compared to Juliet and Romeo’s dialogue, this excerpt seems rather disfluent; but it is actually the artifact of an orderly coordination process. Conversations do not begin and end abruptly, but with opening and closing routines with which participants establish that they are willing to begin interacting, or ready to say goodbye. At first it seems as if Brad is winding down the conversation by initiating a pre-closing routine with ‘thanks for ringing’. This is followed by Amanda’s too-abrupt ‘bye’. Apparently Brad recognizes that Amanda is not serious about hanging up, and so he stays on the line even after responding with ‘bye bye’. They proceed to draw things out over the next few turns, culminating in joint laughter that displays mutual awareness of this joint pretense. Amanda’s attempt to chide Brad (‘you’re hopeless’) fails, apparently because Brad doesn’t hear her (or perhaps can’t believe what he is hearing). This leads to a repair sequence, during which Brad requests repetition, and Amanda complies. Next, Brad (who by now may have figured out that he is being teased) chides her back with ‘no more than you’, and Amanda attempts further wordplay (‘no more than usual…’). But Brad interprets this as her mishearing him. He attempts a hesitant (and unnecessary) repair, to which Amanda disclaims ‘oh I know’ and then recaps her failed pun. Brad apologizes awkwardly (after an ‘ah’ displaying his belated recognition of her little joke). Then the intrepid Amanda starts up the conversation again. Although only the participants know what they’re thinking moment by moment, even an overhearer can recognize from this transcript that flirting is going on.”

    Like

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