TRUFFLES AMONG TOADSTOOLS: UBER-COOL STUFF

Words are amusing curiosities. Barnumesque, really. And best of all, they’re free.

We can lard our speech with as many impressive words as an English professor. Words like lucifugous, objurgate, rodomontade, uliginous.  Why say etc. when you can say et hoc genus omne?

Next time you fill out the form for a sick day, write aprosexia in that niggly blank space that demands you reveal ‘the nature of your illness‘.  It’s a legit reason ~ the inability to concentrate ~ and seriously hard for many of us these days.

Clifford Nass, author of The Man Who Lied to His Laptop, is a professor of communications at Stanford University in California. He says our technology-addicted lifestyle and non-stop multitasking may be affecting our ability to focus.

A funny thing happened on the way to finding Nass’ book on Amazon. PechaKucha caught my eye. Yep, I lost my focus and got totally distracted by this voice of a new generation. Think: business meeting meets poetry slam.

Mark Dytham and Astrid Klein, two Tokyo-based architects turned PowerPoint into both art form and competitive sport. Their innovation, dubbed PechaKucha (Japanese for “chatter”), applies a simple set of rules to presentations.

20 slides are shown for 20 seconds each (six minutes and 40 seconds in total). This format keeps presentations brief and fast-paced. A typical PechaKucha Night includes 8 to 14 presentations of exquisitely matched words and images. The presenters (and much of the audience) are usually from the design, architecture, photography, and art fields. It’s compelling beat-the-clock performance art.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow said best thing one can do when it’s raining is to let it rain. Jesper Larsson is no fopdoodle. He’s got one moliminous idea here. (It takes a few seconds to load.)
http://www.pechakucha.org/presentations/the-worlds-best-city-when-it-rains

Can’t go to Sweden? Pop over to http://www.rainymood.com/watch?v=jCAMPvQlT4g

The Internet is a big place. When I’m online, it goes without saying that distractions ensue. And more distractions ensue on top of those.  Words, pictures, music, ideas ~ I gather them like eggs at Easter. Some toadstools, but mostly truffles.

Toni 9/10/13